First Endurance Fueling Guide

For superior performance, it’s essential to fuel your body with high-quality nutrients during training, recovery and racing. The First Endurance product line is designed to work together, as a complete endurance system, to maximize endurance and performance. This unparalleled system integrates all of the essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, electrolytes, amino acids, herbs, carbohydrates and proteins you need to get the most out of your training so you can reach your full potential. With the First Endurance system you don’t need to eat, drink or supplement with anything else. The following guide outlines exactly how and when to use the First Endurance nutrition system for training and racing in duration from 45 minutes to 24 hours. So there’s no guessing about what you need or when to take it.

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Ultimate Challenge 12 Week Training Plan

The Ultimate Challenge is one of the most challenging and respected
non-competitive amateur cycling events in North America. A common
roadblock for cyclists training for a long event is scheduling the
training. This twelve-week plan for a century ride will have any
determined cyclist ready to hit the pavement on August 5th.

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Get Back into the Saddle – 4 Week Preparation Plan

The team at PEAK Health and Fitness have put together this 4 week plan
is specifically designed to get you ready to successfully complete the
16 week Ultimate challenge training plan. You’ll be riding 3 days per
week for this part of the training.

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Basic Road Riding Skills

If you’re just starting out, or if you’ve taken the winter off, it’s a
great time to refresh your knowledge of basic cycling skills.

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Corner Like a Pro

Cornering on a bike can be exciting and fun. It can also be intimidating
if you’re new to riding or haven’t had the opportunity to practice your
cornering skills. The key elements to successful cornering are proper
body and bike positioning.

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Should Cyclists Strength Train?

Cyclists often fear that strength training will make them bigger and
heavier which could decrease their efficiency on the bike. While it is
true that weight training can cause an increase in muscle mass, it is
extremely unlikely that the type of training recommended for cyclists
would ever result in major weight gains.

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Recovery Strategies to Improve Performance

Recovery is arguably as important as your quality rides. In weight
training the recovery period is adjusted to reflect the specific goals
of the athlete and is monitored in the same way sets and repetitions are.
In endurance sports, employing recovery strategies help to reduce
soreness, aid in healing damaged muscles, and ultimately improve the
quality of future workouts. Without excessive soreness caused by high
intensity training and poor recovery, the next day’s workout could feel easier at a higher intensity and will ultimately assist in creating a stronger athlete. Here are three recovery strategies to follow as closely as your training program.

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Descend Like a Pro

Coasting downhill is fun and allows your muscles to recover from the previous climb. As with climbing, it’s important to stay relaxed on your bike and trust in your equipment. Confident descending is a skill that has to be practiced. Start practicing these skills on moderate grades and increase the challenge as you become more comfortable.

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Climb Like a Pro

The Ultimate Challenge includes a LOT of climbing. Climbing is hard. Becoming a better climber in cycling requires time in the saddle, climbing hills. However, there are several ways that you can make climbing easier.

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The Importance of Recovery

For serious competitors, recovery should be as important as quality workouts. Failure to allow the body to recover after a workout can lead to overtraining, injury or illness. This article will look at two subjects related to recovery. The first is the results of failure to allow proper recovery including overtraining, illness, and over-use injuries. The second introduces methods to decrease the amount of time needed for the body to recover.

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